Monday, April 25, 2016

TODAY! Manufacturing Faculty Candidate Seminar: "Developing novel laser processing strategies based on spatial, temporal and spectral control of light-matter interaction" By Xiaoming Yu, 4.25.16/11:00AM-12:00PM/ CREOL RM 103

Manufacturing Faculty Candidate Seminar: "Developing novel laser processing strategies based on spatial, temporal and spectral control of light-matter interaction" By Xiaoming Yu
Monday, April 25, 2016 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Xiaoming YuPh.D. Candidate
Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Kansas State University

Abstract:
Lasers have been widely used as an effective tool in various manufacturing processes, such as drilling, cutting, welding and surface texturing. Compared to traditional manufacturing methods, laser-based materials processing techniques have the ability to treat a wide range of materials, is inherently non-contact, and can eliminate tool wear. However, demanding manufacturing processes emerging from the fields of nano and 3D fabrication require the development of advanced laser processing strategies that can address critical issues such as machining resolution, processing flexibility, and energy efficiency. My research is aimed at developing these capabilities based on fundamental understandings of light-matter interaction, and demonstrating the possibilities and advantages of controlling laser irradiation in spatial, temporal and spectral domains. I first demonstrate the flexibility of applying spatial beam shaping in laser processing of thin film solar cells, with emphasis on the extension of focal range by orders-of-magnitude with the use of Bessel beams. This approach greatly enhances process tolerance to surface unevenness and positioning error. With a two-color femtosecond laser micromachining setup, I show that electron dynamics can be controlled, and nano-scale features can be achieved on dielectrics using only a fraction of pulse energy for the short-wavelength beam. This paves the way for future adoption of short-wavelength laser sources, such as in the extreme ultraviolet range, for direct nano-fabrication with below-threshold pulse energy. These results highlight the great potential of fully-optimized laser systems as a manufacturing tool, and signify a future when this new tool could be used as naturally and efficiently as mechanical tools nowadays, but for more challenging problems.

Biography:
Mr. Xiaoming Yu is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering at Kansas State University. Mr. Yu’s research interests are laser-based materials processing and light-matter interaction. He received M.S. degree in Plasma Physics from Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics in 2012, and B.S. degree in Physics from Nankai University in 2008.

For more information:
Dr. Peter J. Delfyett

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