Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Seminar: "Semiconductor Nanomaterials for Information and Energy Technologies" by Dr. Yajie Dong 10.6.14/ 11:00am-12:00pm/ CREOL 103

Seminar: "Semiconductor Nanomaterials for Information and Energy Technologies" by Dr. Yajie Dong
Monday, October 6, 2014 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 103


ABSTRACT:
Low dimensional nanomaterials (1 D nanowires and 0 D quantum dots) represent important nanoscale building blocks with substantial potential for exploring new device concepts and materials for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and energy technology applications. Three examples will be presented.  First, I will discuss my discovery of unique rectified silver/amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon (Ag/a-Si/c-Si) crossbar resistive random access memory (RRAM) effect in c-Si/a-Si core/shell nanowires and provide a comprehensive comparison between nanowire based and planar silicon based Ag/a-Si/c-Si RRAMs. The history of how this accidental nanowire based discovery solved a decades-long sneak current problem in RRAM field and eventually evolved into a game changing mainstream flash memory successor, Crossbar Memory, will be presented. Then I will report the experimental realization of high efficiency single coaxial group III-nitride heterostructured nanowire photovoltaic devices and light emitting devices. Meanwhile, a universal van der Waals epitaxial growth strategy for compound semiconductor nanowire arrays will be discussed. The vision of how the combination of nanowire array growth and heterostructured nanowire devices could possibly change the substrate limited status of III-Nitride research fields will be outlined. Lastly, I will present how quantum dots materials innovation and novel device structure design/processing helped resolve one long standing issue for organic based light emitting devices, the efficiency roll off at high driving current density. As a result, record breaking ultrabright, highly efficient, low roll off inverted red quantum dot light emitting devices (QLEDs) have been achieved (165,000Cd/m2 at <6v attack="" be="" discussed="" driving="" end.="" in="" instability="" issue="" long="" of="" only="" p="" qleds="" remaining="" strategies="" term="" the="" to="" voltage="" will="">

BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Yajie Dong is an assistant professor in NanoScience Technology Center of University of Central Florida. He got his BS and MS degrees in Chemistry from Tsinghua University of Beijing, China. In 2010, he received his PhD degree from Prof. Charles Lieber's group at Chemistry and Chemical Biology Department of Harvard University. From 2010 to 2012, he was a postdoctoral associate working with Professors Yet-Ming Chiang and W. Craig Carter in the department of Material Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before joining NSTC of UCF in August 2014, he worked as a Senior Scientist for QD Vision Inc., a Nanotech Startup based on research of Professors Moungi Bawendi and Vladimir Bulovic’s groups at MIT and located in Lexington, MA. He is broadly interested in materials challenges in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and energy technologies, particularly in nanoscale nonvolatile resistive switches for information processing and storage, compound semiconductor nanowires or quantum dots based high efficiency energy conversion (LED and PV) devices and new battery materials and architectures for large scale energy storage.

For additional information: 
Dr. Bahaa Saleh
Dean & Director, Professor of Optics
407-882-3326

Monday, September 15, 2014

Seminar: "Sensing molecules with frequency combs" By Dr. Konstantin Vodopyanov 11.7.14/ 12:00-1:00pm/ CREOL Rm 103

Abstract:
Optical frequency combs produced in the visible spectral range by ultrafast mode-locked lasers have revolutionized precision spectroscopy and time metrology, culminating in the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics. I will present a new technique for extending frequency combs to the highly desirable yet difficult-to-achieve mid-infrared range - the region of fundamental molecular vibrational-rotational resonances (fingerprints). The technique is based on subharmonic optical parametric oscillation (OPO) that can be considered as a reverse of second harmonic generation. Using ultrafast erbium or thulium fiber lasers as a pump, we produce frequency combs that are approximately octave wide and centered around 3 µm or 4 µm in wavelength. I will talk about coherent properties of the generated mid-IR combs, as well as their applications for trace molecular detection.

Biography:
Konstantin L. Vodopyanov obtained his MS degree from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology ("Phys-Tech") and accomplished his PhD and DSc (Habilitation) in the Oscillations Lab. of Lebedev Physical Institute (later General Physics Inst.), led by Nobel Prize winner Alexander Prokhorov. He was an assistant professor at Moscow Phys-Tech (1985-90), Alexander-von-Humboldt Fellow at the University of Bayreuth, Germany (1990-92), and a Royal Society postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at Imperial College, London, UK (1992-98). In 1998, he moved to the United States and became head of the laser group at Inrad, Inc., NJ (1998-2000), and later director of mid-IR systems at Picarro, Inc.,CA (2000-2003). His other industry experience includes co-founding and providing technical guidance for several US and European companies. In 2003 he returned to Academia (Stanford University, 2003-2013) and is now a 21st Century Scholar Chair & Professor of Optics at CREOL, College of Optics & Photonics, Univ. Central Florida. Dr. Vodopyanov is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), Optical Society of America (OSA), SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, UK Institute of Physics (IOP), and a Senior Member of IEEE. He has > 325 technical publications and is member of program committees for several major laser conferences including CLEO (most recent, General Chair in 2010) and Photonics West (Conference Chair). His research interests include nonlinear optics, laser spectroscopy, mid-IR and terahertz-wave generation, ultra broadband frequency combs and their biomedical applications.

For additional information:

Konstantin Vodopyanov

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Distinguished Seminar Series: "Optical technologies paving the road from Helmet Mounted Displays to Virtual and Augmented Reality consumer headsets, Smart Glasses and Smart Eyewear." by Bernard Kress, PhD. 10.10.14/12:00pm-1:00pm/ CREOL Room 103

Distinguished Seminar Series: "Optical technologies paving the road from Helmet Mounted Displays to Virtual and Augmented Reality consumer headsets, Smart Glasses and Smart Eyewear." by Bernard Kress, PhD.
Friday, October 10, 2014 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Bernard Kress, PhD.
Principal Optical Architect
Google Glass Project
Google [X] Labs.

Abstract:
Helmet Mounted Displays (HMDs) and Head Up Displays (HUDs) have been used extensively over the last decades in the defense sector. The complexity of the design and the fabrication of high quality see-through combiner optics to achieve high resolution over a large FOV have prevented their use in consumer electronic devices.
Occlusion Head Mounted Displays (HMD) have also been used in the defense sector for simulation and training purposes, over similar large FOV, packed with custom head tracking and eye gesture sensors.
Recently, a paradigm shift to consumer electronics has occured as part of the wider wearable computing effort. Technologies developed for the smart phone industry have been used to build smaller, lower power, cheaper, electronics. Similarly, novel integrated sensors and micro-displays have enabled the development of consumer electronic smart glasses and smart eyewear, professional AR (Augmented Reality) HMDs as well as VR (Virtual Reality) headsets.
Reducing the FOV while addressing the needs for an increased exit pupil alongside stringent industrial design constrains have been pushing the limits of the design techniques available to the optical engineer (refractive, catadioptric, micro-optic, segmented Fresnel, waveguide, diffractive, holographic, …).
However, the integration of the optical combiner within conventional meniscus prescription lenses is a challenge that has yet to be solved.
We will review how various optical design techniques have been applied to such tasks, as well as the various head-worn devices developed to date. Finally, we will review additional optical technologies applied as input mechanisms (eye and head gesture sensing, gaze tracking and hand gesture sensing).

Biography:
For over 20 years, Bernard has made significant scientific contributions as a researcher, professor, consultant, advisor, instructor, and author, in the field of micro-optics, diffractive optics and holography for research, industry and consumer electronics. He has been involved in half a dozen start-ups in the Silicon Valley on optical data storage, optical telecom, optical position sensors and display (picos, HUDs and HMDs). Bernard holds 28 international granted patents and 30 patents applications. He has published more than 100 proceeding papers and 18 refereed journal papers. He is a short course instructor for the SPIE on micro-optics, diffractive optics and wafer scale optics. He has published three books edited by John Wiley and Sons and Mac Graw Hill and a field guide by SPIE. He has been chairman of the SPIE conference “Photonics for Harsh Environments” for the past three years. He is currently with Google [X] working on the Google Glass project as principal Optical Architect.

For more information:
Dr. Bahaa Saleh 
Dean & Director, Professor of Optics 

407-823-6834

Seminar: "Recent advances in LIBS instrumentation: Application in quantification and elemental imaging" by Vincent Motto-Ros 9.26.14/ 11:00am-12:00pm/ CREOL Room 103

Seminar: "Recent advances in LIBS instrumentation: Application in quantification and elemental imaging" by Vincent Motto-Ros
Friday, September 26, 2014 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Abstract
Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is recognized as a promising technique which enables elemental analysis of any type of material. It is extremely versatile with high potential in term of applications, offering standoff analysis capability, requiring only simple sample preparation, and providing fast and real-time analysis. However, improving the repeatability and the reproducibility of LIBS measurements is still the challenging issue faced by the technique to fit the requirements of precise and accurate quantitative analysis.
In the first part of this presentation, I will describe a new generation of LIBS instrument developed in our institute. The basic instrumental concept is to assist, either manually or automatically, the optical detection fiber by a real-time imaging of the plasma. This tends to improve greatly the stability of LIBS measurement in short as well in long terms [1], allowing unprecedented level of performances in elemental quantification (c.f. fig. 1a.). In the second part, some of our recent results will be presented in the frame of elemental imaging of biological tissue. We will show different examples of elemental images, sections of tumors and murine kidneys, with an investigation focused on the renal clearance of theranostic gadolinium-based nanoparticles (Fig. 1b.). The efficiency of LIBS imaging allows elements being mapped and quantified in tissues without any labeling and with an instrumentation fully compatible with standard optical microscope systems, offering a valuable tools in the fields of nanotechnology, biology, as well as medicine. [2].

Fig. 1. a) Example of calibration curve typically obtained with our LIBS setup. b) Elemental imaging principle and example of images obtained for a section of murine kidneys with 20 µm space resolution.



[1]   Motto-Ros, V et al. Precise alignment of the collection fiber assisted by real-time plasma imaging in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Spectrochim. Acta B 92, 60-69 (2014).
[2]   Sancey, L. et al. Laser spectrometry for multi-elemental imaging of biological tissues, Sc. Rep. 4, 6065 (2014).

Biography:
Associated Professor, Institut Lumière Matière, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bâtiment Kastler, 69622 Villeurbanne, France
Vincent Motto-Ros graduated with a M.S. in "Laser and Spectroscopy" in the University of Lyon (France) in 2002 and continued to complete his Ph.D. in the 'Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Ionique et Moléculaire' (Lasim, Lyon) working on "high-precision and high-sensitive spectroscopy of gaseous molecular species (O2, H2O, NO2) using high finesse cavities pumped by CW laser diode" under the direction of Pr. Patrick Rairoux. He starts his research on LIBS in 2007 with a post-Doc position in the Canadian Space Agency for which he demonstrated the potential of artificial neural network (ANN) in LIBS data processing for material identification and quantitative measurements of elements of planetological interest. He was recruited in 2008 by the Lyon 1 University as Associated Professor in the Jin Yu’s team (LASIM, called now Light and Matter Institute). He developed advanced experimental setups for fundamental research as well as applications related to laser-induced plasma. His panel covers the fundamentals of laser-induced plasmas, the application of laser spectroscopies such as LIBS, Fluorescence and Raman, as fundamental diagnostics as well as sensing techniques for industrial, environmental, geological and biomedical applications.

For additional information:  
Dr. Matthieu Baudelet
407-823-6910



Tuesday, September 2, 2014

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM - Dr. Michael Rubinstein of University of North Carolina, Friday, September 5, 4:30 pm, PSB 161

Airway Surface Brush Sweeps Lungs Clean: Polymer Physics Helps Us Breathe Easier
The classical view of the airway surface liquid (ASL) is that it consists of two layers – mucus and periciliary layer (PCL). Mucus layer is propelled by cilia and rides on the top of PCL, which is assumed to be a low viscosity dilute liquid. This model of ASL does not explain what stabilizes the mucus layer and prevents it from penetrating the PCL. I propose a different model of ASL in which PCL consists of a dense brush of mucins attached to cilia. This brush stabilizes mucus layer and prevents it penetration into PCL, while providing lubrication and elastic coupling between beating cilia. Both physical and biological implications of the new model will be discussed.


Friday, August 29, 2014

LPTH Press Release: LightPath Technologies Schedules Fiscal 2014 Fourth Quarter Conference Call

LightPath Technologies Schedules Fiscal 2014
Fourth Quarter Conference Call

Financial Results to be Announced on September 3rd After Market Close 


For Immediate Release

ORLANDO, FL – August 28, 2014 -- LightPath Technologies, Inc. (“LightPath”, the “Company” or “we”) (NASDAQ: LPTH), a global manufacturer, distributor and integrator of patented optical components and high-level assemblies, today announced the scheduling of a conference call and simultaneous webcast to discuss the Company’s financial and operational results for the fiscal 2014 fourth quarter ended June 30, 2014.


Conference Call Details:

Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2014 
Time: 4:30 PM (ET)
Dial-in Number: 1-800-860-2442   
International Dial-in Number: 1-412-858-4600  
Webcast: http://services.choruscall.com/links/lpth140828.html

Participants are recommended to dial-in or log-on approximately 10 minutes prior to the start of the event. A replay of the call will be available approximately one hour after completion through September 12, 2014. To listen to the replay, dial 1-877-344-7529 (domestic) or 1-412-317-0088 (international), and enter conference ID # 10051212.



About LightPath Technologies

LightPath (NASDAQ: LPTH) manufactures optical products including precision molded aspheric optics, GRADIUM® glass products, proprietary collimator assemblies, laser components utilizing proprietary automation technology, higher-level assemblies and packing solutions. The Company's products are used in various markets, including industrial, medical, defense, test & measurement and telecommunications. LightPath has a strong patent portfolio that has been granted or licensed to us in these fields.  For more information, visit www.lightpath.com.



This news release includes statements that constitute forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. This information may involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, factors detailed by LightPath Technologies, Inc. in its public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as required under the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Company does not have any intention or obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.



GRADIUM® is a registered trademark of LightPath Technologies.


###



Dorothy Cipolla, CFO                                                   
LightPath Technologies, Inc.
407-382-4003 x305                                                                                      

                             
Jordan Darrow
Darrow Associates, Inc.
631-367-1866



 

Thursday, August 28, 2014

TOMORROW! Physics Seminar: "Octave-wide frequency combs in the mid-infrared and their applications for sensing molecules" Konstantin Vodopyanov/ 8.29.14/ Physical Sciences Room 161

Physics Seminar: "Octave-wide frequency combs in the mid-infrared and their applications for sensing molecules" Konstantin Vodopyanov
Friday, August 29, 2014 4:30 PM to 6:00 PM
Physical Sciences Room 161

Optical frequency combs produced by ultrafast mode-locked lasers have revolutionized precision spectroscopy and time metrology, culminating in the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics. I will present a new technique for extending frequency combs to the highly desirable yet difficult-to-achieve mid-infrared range - the region of fundamental molecular fingerprints. The technique is based on subharmonic optical parametric oscillation (OPO) that can be considered as a reverse of second harmonic generation. Using ultrafast erbium or thulium fiber lasers as a pump, we produce frequency combs that can be more than octave wide, e.g. span from 2.5 to 6 µm without gaps. I will talk about coherent properties of the generated mid-IR combs, as well as their applications including trace molecular detection via absorption spectroscopy. Working in the Fourier domain allows taking advantage of massive parallelism of spectral measurements (thanks to the broad spectrum), as well as very high speed of data acquisition (thanks to the coherent nature of the frequency combs), up to 1M spectral points in a fraction of a second.

Contact: Pat Korosec 407-823-2325