Thursday, March 26, 2015

TOMORROW! NSTC/CREOL Distinguished Seminar Series: "The Rise of Organic Photonics and Electronics" by Dr. Bernard Kippelen 3.27.15/11:00am-12:00pm/ CREOL Rm 103

NSTC/CREOL Distinguished Seminar Series: "The Rise of Organic Photonics and Electronics" by Dr. Bernard Kippelen
Friday, March 27, 2015 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

 Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Bernard Kippelen, Ph.D
Georgia Institute of Technology

Abstract:
Printed organic electronics, a technology based on carbon-based semiconductors that can be processed into thin films using conventional coating and printing techniques, has been the subject of active research over the past decades. Due to their ability to be processed at low temperature, over large areas, at low cost, carbon-based semiconductors can lead to a new generation of energy-efficient products using energy-efficient manufacturing approaches. While the organic semiconductor layer plays a central role, the interfaces that are formed between the organic semiconducting layer and adjacent oxide layers or electrodes are also very critical and often determine the overall electrical performance of the device.
In this talk, we will discuss recent progress in a range of solid-state devices, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), sensors, organic solar cells, and photodetectors. We will present strategies to modify and stabilize the electronic properties of interfaces that can yield devices with improved performance and longer lifetime. Examples of recent studies to reduce the environmental footprint of this emerging technology will be provided. We will show that these advances can lead to disruptive innovations to address some of the world’s greatest challenges.

Biography:
Bernard Kippelen is the Joseph M. Pettit Professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, located in Atlanta, GA, USA. His research interests range from the investigation of fundamental physical processes (nonlinear optical activity, charge transport, light harvesting and emission) in organic-based nanostructured thin films, to the design, fabrication and testing of light-weight flexible optoelectronic devices based on hybrid printable materials. He serves as co-President of the Institut Lafayette (Metz, France), and as Director of the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics (Atlanta, USA). He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (2006), and a Fellow of SPIE (2007).

Contact Details:
Ushaben Lal
Travel Coordinator
NanoScience Technology Center

University of Central Florida

Thursday, March 12, 2015

NSTC/AMPAC/CREOL Distinguished Seminar Series: “Three Dimensionally Structured Materials for Energy Storage and Light Harvesting”- Paul Braun 3.17.15 11:00am-12:00pm/ HEC Rm 101

NSTC/AMPAC/CREOL Distinguished Seminar Series: “Three Dimensionally Structured Materials for Energy Storage and Light Harvesting”- Paul Braun
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
HEC Room 101

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Abstract:
Over the past decade, the sophistication of self and directed-assembly approaches for functional composite structures has increased dramatically, however, application of such structures in real-world systems has remained largely elusive, in part because such structures almost always contain finite defect densities.  The storing, generating and harvesting of photons and electrons presents a unique opportunity for self-assembled composite materials.  These applications are not only generally much more defect tolerant than for example self-assembled computational electronics, but also for these areas to make a substantive impact on the world energy situation, they must be produced in exceptionally large volume.  In my talk, I will attempt to capture the state-of-the-art in highly functional self-assembled three-dimensional composites for energy harvesting and storage illustrated with examples from both my research and other groups with a particular focus on high charge and discharge rate nanostructured electrochemical energy storage systems (batteries and supercapacitors), and photonic crystals which exhibit unprecedented control over the absorption and emission of light (lasers, LEDs, and solar cells).

Biography:
Paul V. Braun is the Ivan Racheff Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and an affiliate of the Department of Chemistry, the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prof. Braun’s research focuses on the synthesis and properties of 3D architectures with a focus on materials with unique optical, electrochemical, thermal, and mechanical properties. Prof. Braun received his B.S. degree with distinction from Cornell University in 1993, and his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Illinois in 1998. Following a postdoctoral appointment at Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies, he joined the faculty at Illinois in 1999. Prof. Braun has co-authored a book, authored about 200 peer-reviewed publications, been awarded multiple patents, and has co-founded two companies. He is the recipient of the Young Alumnus Award (2011), the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award (2010), the Stanley H. Pierce Faculty Award (2010), Beckman Young Investigator Award (2001), a 3M Nontenured Faculty Award, the 2002 Robert Lansing Hardy Award from TMS, the Xerox Award for Faculty Research (2004, 2009), and multiple teaching awards. In 2006, he was named a University Scholar by the University of Illinois, and in 2011 was named the Ivan Racheff Professor of Materials Science and Engineering.

For additional information:

Debashis Chanda

Friday, March 6, 2015

TODAY!! Seminar: "New Materials for Mid-Infrared Nonlinear Optics" by Peter G. Schunemann 3.6.15/ 12:00-1:00pm/ CREOL Rm 103

Seminar: "New Materials for Mid-Infrared Nonlinear Optics" by Peter G. Schunemann
Friday, March 6, 2015 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Peter G. Schunemann
BAE Systems, Inc

Abstract
Mid-infrared nonlinear optical crystals have matured in the last twenty-five years from scientific curiosities into practical robust materials generating efficient laser output in the 2-12 micron spectral range.  ZnGeP2 (ZGP) in particular has emerged as the NLO material of choice for frequency conversion between 2 and 8 microns, and is growing in importance with the advent of high power thulium fiber lasers. ZGP, however, still has two main limitations: 1) its transparency and phase-matching range make it incompatible with 1- and 1.5-micron laser pumping; and 2) its usefulness for generating output in the 8-12 micron atmospheric window is limited by severe multi-phonon absorption. These limitations have been overcome by several new mid-infrared nonlinear crystals: cadmium silicon phosphide (CdSiP2), orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs), and orientation-patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP).
CdSiP2 (CSP) is a bulk birefringent chalcopyrite analog of ZGP grown by horizontal gradient freeze growth in a transparent furnace. Its larger band gap (512 nm) and birefringence (-0.05) allows for 1- and 1.5-mm pumping, and its nonlinear coefficient (d14=85 pm/V) and thermal conductivity (13 W/mK) are dramatically higher than existing materials (AgGaS2, AgGaSe2, and PPLN) that can be pumped at these wavelengths.
OP-GaAs and OP-GaP are quasi-phase-matched (QPM) nonlinear optical semiconductors grown by a novel all-epitaxial process.  First, polar-on-nonpolar MBE is used to produce a GaAs (GaP) film with an orientation that is inverted with respect to the substrate. The inverted layer is photo-lithographically patterned and etched with the desired grating structure, and both orientations are then re-grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) at rates up to 200mm/hr to produce thick (> 1mm), low-loss (< 0.01cm-1) QPM layers for in-plane laser pumping. OP-GaAs has the highest gain among all QPM materials, and can be pumped at 2-mm to generate output at 8-12 mm and beyond, whereas OP-GaP is a low-loss QPM ZGP analog than can be pumped with 1-mm lasers.
Finally, all-epitaxial growth technology is being used to grow ternary semiconductors with engineered band gaps for use as optical limiters.
Recent advances in growth, processing, and NLO device performance of all these materials will be discussed. 

Biography
Peter G. Schunemann has been a leading researcher in nonlinear optical materials for the last 25 years, authoring or co-authoring over 250 publications in the field. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT in 1984 and 1987 before joining BAE Systems, where he has led a series of development efforts to produce improved crystals for mid-infrared frequency conversion, most notably ZnGeP2, AgGaSe2, CdGeAs2, CdSiP2, and OPGaAs. His work on ZnGeP2 in particular, a critical component for next generation laser-based IRCM systems, earned him a Quarterly Technical Achievement Award in 1992, the Jack L. Bowers Award in 1994 (the company’s highest technical award), and a Nova Award in 1995 (Lockheed Martin’s highest honor for technical excellence), and the Association of Old Crows Technology Hall of Fame award in 2002.  He is an OSA Fellow, a member of SPIE and MRS, and is currently the president of AACG (American Association of Crystal Growth).

For additional information:

Dr. Konstantin L. Vodopyanov

NSTC/CREOL Distinguished Seminar Series: "The Rise of Organic Photonics and Electronics" by Dr. Bernard Kippelen 3.27.15/ 11:00am-12:00pm/ CREOL Rm 103

NSTC/CREOL Distinguished Seminar Series: "The Rise of Organic Photonics and Electronics" by Dr. Bernard Kippelen
Friday, March 27, 2015 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

 Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Bernard Kippelen, Ph.D
Georgia Institute of Technology

Abstract:
Printed organic electronics, a technology based on carbon-based semiconductors that can be processed into thin films using conventional coating and printing techniques, has been the subject of active research over the past decades. Due to their ability to be processed at low temperature, over large areas, at low cost, carbon-based semiconductors can lead to a new generation of energy-efficient products using energy-efficient manufacturing approaches. While the organic semiconductor layer plays a central role, the interfaces that are formed between the organic semiconducting layer and adjacent oxide layers or electrodes are also very critical and often determine the overall electrical performance of the device.
In this talk, we will discuss recent progress in a range of solid-state devices, including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), sensors, organic solar cells, and photodetectors. We will present strategies to modify and stabilize the electronic properties of interfaces that can yield devices with improved performance and longer lifetime. Examples of recent studies to reduce the environmental footprint of this emerging technology will be provided. We will show that these advances can lead to disruptive innovations to address some of the world’s greatest challenges.

Biography:
Bernard Kippelen is the Joseph M. Pettit Professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, located in Atlanta, GA, USA. His research interests range from the investigation of fundamental physical processes (nonlinear optical activity, charge transport, light harvesting and emission) in organic-based nanostructured thin films, to the design, fabrication and testing of light-weight flexible optoelectronic devices based on hybrid printable materials. He serves as co-President of the Institut Lafayette (Metz, France), and as Director of the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics (Atlanta, USA). He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (2006), and a Fellow of SPIE (2007).

Contact Details:
Ushaben Lal
Travel Coordinator
NanoScience Technology Center

University of Central Florida

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Celebrating the International Year of Light: Evolving Lasers to Solve Problems by Jeff Hecht 3.13.15/ 1:50-2:45pm/ UCF Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom

Celebrating the International Year of Light: Evolving Lasers to Solve Problems by Jeff Hecht
Friday, March 13, 2015 1:50 PM to 2:45 PM
UCF Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom


Jeff Hecht
Science and technology writer

Abstract: 
Soon after he helped Ted Mainam make the first laser, Irnee D’Haenens jokingly called the laser    “a solution looking for a problem.” That became a running joke in early days of lasers, because the few lasers then available were not well-matched to many applications. But that changes as the young technology evolved. The more we learned about laser science, the better we could design lasers to match the needs of potential applications. Similarly, people could take these newly developed lasers and adapt them to solve other problems. A sterling example is the blue diode laser, developed to play HD Video disks, and then adapted to make bright blue LEDs that laid the foundation for solid-state lighting. Another is how the fiber amplifier, developed for fiber-optic communications, was adapted to make industrial fiber lasers. This talk will describe how lasers and their applications have evolved in the past and will continue to evolve in the future.

Biography:

Jeff Hecht is a contributing editor for Laser Focus World, and has written extensively on lasers, photonics and fiber optics for more than 30 years. His books include Understanding Fiber Optics, Understanding Lasers, City of Light, The Story of Fiber Optics, Beam: The Race to Make the Laser, and The Laser Guidebook. He received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Caltech, and is a senior member of the Optical Society of America and a life member of IEEE.

TOMORROW! SID Student Chapter Seminar: "Near Infrared-Light Directing Chiral Liquid Crystal Superstructures: From 1D to 3D" by Dr. Ling Wang 3.6.15/10:00-11:00am/ CREOL Rm 103

SID Student Chapter Seminar: "Near Infrared-Light Directing Chiral Liquid Crystal Superstructures: From 1D to 3D" by Dr. Ling Wang
Friday, March 6, 2015 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
CREOL Room 103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Ling Wang
Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University

Abstract:
Endowing external, remote, and dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with tailored functionalities is a principal driving force in the bottom-up nanofabrication of molecular devices. Light-driven chiral molecular switches or motors in liquid crystal (LC) media capable of self-organizing into optically tunable one-dimensional (1D) and three dimensional (3D) superstructures represent such an elegant system. However, employing near infrared (NIR) light would be much more desirable than either ultraviolet or visible light in the fields such as life science, materials science, and aerospace due to its superior penetration and invisibility for temporal and spatial remote activation of materials with relatively low interference and high precision. In this talk, I will focus on our recent research and development on the NIR-responsive molecular switches and their applications for triggering chiral liquid crystal superstructures: from 1D to 3D.

Biography:
Ling Wang is currently a postdoctoral research associate in the group of Prof. Quan Li at the Liquid Crystal Institute from Kent State University. He received his Ph.D. in the Department of Materials Physics & Chemistry from University of Science and Technology Beijing (2013), and then he worked as a research associate in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering from Peking University. Together with his advisor Prof. Huai Yang. His research focuses on the synthesis, properties and applications of liquid crystal materials, stimuli-responsive molecular switches, and novel functional nanomaterials.  


TOMORROW! Seminar: "New Materials for Mid-Infrared Nonlinear Optics" by Peter G. Schunemann 3.6.15/12:00-1:00pm/ CREOL Rm 103

Seminar: "New Materials for Mid-Infrared Nonlinear Optics" by Peter G. Schunemann
Friday, March 6, 2015 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Peter G. Schunemann
BAE Systems, Inc

Abstract
Mid-infrared nonlinear optical crystals have matured in the last twenty-five years from scientific curiosities into practical robust materials generating efficient laser output in the 2-12 micron spectral range.  ZnGeP2 (ZGP) in particular has emerged as the NLO material of choice for frequency conversion between 2 and 8 microns, and is growing in importance with the advent of high power thulium fiber lasers. ZGP, however, still has two main limitations: 1) its transparency and phase-matching range make it incompatible with 1- and 1.5-micron laser pumping; and 2) its usefulness for generating output in the 8-12 micron atmospheric window is limited by severe multi-phonon absorption. These limitations have been overcome by several new mid-infrared nonlinear crystals: cadmium silicon phosphide (CdSiP2), orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs), and orientation-patterned gallium phosphide (OP-GaP).
CdSiP2 (CSP) is a bulk birefringent chalcopyrite analog of ZGP grown by horizontal gradient freeze growth in a transparent furnace. Its larger band gap (512 nm) and birefringence (-0.05) allows for 1- and 1.5-mm pumping, and its nonlinear coefficient (d14=85 pm/V) and thermal conductivity (13 W/mK) are dramatically higher than existing materials (AgGaS2, AgGaSe2, and PPLN) that can be pumped at these wavelengths.
OP-GaAs and OP-GaP are quasi-phase-matched (QPM) nonlinear optical semiconductors grown by a novel all-epitaxial process.  First, polar-on-nonpolar MBE is used to produce a GaAs (GaP) film with an orientation that is inverted with respect to the substrate. The inverted layer is photo-lithographically patterned and etched with the desired grating structure, and both orientations are then re-grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) at rates up to 200mm/hr to produce thick (> 1mm), low-loss (< 0.01cm-1) QPM layers for in-plane laser pumping. OP-GaAs has the highest gain among all QPM materials, and can be pumped at 2-mm to generate output at 8-12 mm and beyond, whereas OP-GaP is a low-loss QPM ZGP analog than can be pumped with 1-mm lasers.
Finally, all-epitaxial growth technology is being used to grow ternary semiconductors with engineered band gaps for use as optical limiters.
Recent advances in growth, processing, and NLO device performance of all these materials will be discussed. 

Biography
Peter G. Schunemann has been a leading researcher in nonlinear optical materials for the last 25 years, authoring or co-authoring over 250 publications in the field. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT in 1984 and 1987 before joining BAE Systems, where he has led a series of development efforts to produce improved crystals for mid-infrared frequency conversion, most notably ZnGeP2, AgGaSe2, CdGeAs2, CdSiP2, and OPGaAs. His work on ZnGeP2 in particular, a critical component for next generation laser-based IRCM systems, earned him a Quarterly Technical Achievement Award in 1992, the Jack L. Bowers Award in 1994 (the company’s highest technical award), and a Nova Award in 1995 (Lockheed Martin’s highest honor for technical excellence), and the Association of Old Crows Technology Hall of Fame award in 2002.  He is an OSA Fellow, a member of SPIE and MRS, and is currently the president of AACG (American Association of Crystal Growth).

For additional information:

Dr. Konstantin L. Vodopyanov