Tuesday, December 6, 2016

OSA Traveling Lecturer Talk: "Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse" by Dr. Rick Trebino Monday, December 19th, 2016 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM CREOL Room 103

OSA Traveling Lecturer Talk: "Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse" by Dr. Rick Trebino
Monday, December 19th, 2016 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
CREOL Room 103
Donuts and coffee will be served.


Abstract:
The vast majority of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time have resulted directly from more powerful techniques for measuring light.  Indeed, our most important source of information about our universe is light, and our ability to extract information from it is limited only by our ability to measure it.
Interestingly, the vast majority of light in our universe remains immeasurable, involving long pulses of relatively broadband light, necessarily involving ultrafast and extremely complex temporal variations in their intensity and phase. So it is important to develop techniques for measuring, ever more completely, light with ever more complex submicron detail in space and ever more complex ultrafast variations in time. The problem is severely complicated by the fact that the timescales involved correspond to the shortest events ever created, and measuring an event in time seems to require a shorter one, which, by definition, doesn’t exist!
Nevertheless, we have developed simple, elegant methods for completely measuring these events, yielding a light pulse's intensity and phase vs. time and space. One involves making an optical spectrogram of the pulse in a nonlinear optical medium and whose mathematics is equivalent to the two-dimensional phase-retrieval problem—a problem that’s solvable only because the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra fails for polynomials of two variables. And we have recently developed simple methods for measuring the complete spatio-temporal electric field [E(x,y,z,t)] of an arbitrary light pulse—even for a single pulse.

Nine measured and simulated snapshots of an ultrashort laser pulse (seen from the side) as it propagates through a focus. Color indicates the instantaneous frequency of the pulse (i.e., the phase).  The interesting submicron spatial and ultrafast temporal (and superluminal) structure results from diffraction of the beam at the edge of the focusing lens.Fore-runner pulse

Biography:
Rick Trebino received his B.A. from Harvard University in 1977 and his Ph.D. degree from Stanford University in 1983. His dissertation research involved the development of a technique for the measurement of ultrafast events in the frequency domain using long-pulse lasers by creating moving gratings.  He continued this research during a three-year term as a physical sciences research associate at Stanford. In 1986, he moved to Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. There he developed Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), the first technique for the measurement of the intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. In 1998, he became the Georgia Research Alliance-Eminent Scholar Chair of Ultrafast Optical Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he currently studies ultrafast optics and applications.
Prof. Trebino has received several prizes, including the SPIE’s Edgerton Prize, and he was an IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Distinguished Lecturer.  He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Society of Photo-Instrumentation Engineers.  His interests include adventure travel, archaeology, photography, humor-writing, and primitive art. 

For additional information:
Rachel Sampson

Seminar: "Irradiation-Enabled, Energy-Efficient Fabrication of Next Generation Nanocomposites for Plasmonics and Transmissive Optics" by Myungkoo Kang, 12.15.16/1:-00PM-2:00PM/CREOL RM 103

Seminar: "Irradiation-Enabled, Energy-Efficient Fabrication of Next Generation Nanocomposites for Plasmonics and Transmissive Optics" by Myungkoo Kang
Thursday, December 15, 2016 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Myungkoo Kang
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Pennsylvania State University

Abstract
Plasmonics and gradient refractive index (GRIN) optics provide unique opportunities to engineer material systems capable of novel properties that lie outside what is found in nature. Meanwhile, the fabrication of plasmonic devices and GRIN lenses has typically involved multi-step processes such as electron beam evaporation, lithography and lamination, typically limited to the front or back surface of device structures. Ion and laser irradiation has emerged as promising approaches to generate a wide variety of self-assembled nanostructures. While irradiation has been traditionally considered destructive and therefore contrary to most plasmonic and optical material manufacturing strategies, key ion-solid and light-matter interactions have been creatively exploited to enable the seemingly-destructive method to constructively fabricate structures, realizing counterintuitive results in the form of advanced functionalities. In this talk, I will focus on the influences of energetic ion and laser beams on a wide range of material systems including III-V compound semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses at the nanoscale and the formation of spatially-controlled nanostructures with desirable properties in the matrices. These technologies are promising for next generation plasmonic and transmissive optical applications.

The first part of my talk will focus on the utilization of focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation on a wide range of III-V semiconductors to self-assemble a wide variety of nanostructures including nanoparticles, nanorods and nanochains [1-5]. Furthermore, I will present our recent results on the utilization of the tunable localized surface plasmon resonance energies in the FIB-assembled nanopartice arrays to enhance light emission efficiencies of compound semiconductors, thereby providing a promising alternative to plasmonic materials [6-8]. The second part of my talk will focus on our recent progress in creating advanced optical functionality in chalcogenide-based nanocomposites for diverse applications. Specifically, our research team was the first to utilize laser exposure on chalcogenide glasses to create spatially-controlled metallic nanocrystals with refractive indices greater than those of glass matrices at temperatures lower than those required in traditional processes. This approach enables gradient GRIN lenses expected to replace complex optical components, thereby opening up new opportunities for researchers to exploit increased design flexibility and cost-effectiveness for future microlens-based devices [9]. Lastly, I will discuss questions which emerge as consequences of my research projects, and propose near future plans to develop a broadly applicable toolkit that will enable tailoring light-matter interactions for a wide range of applications in plasmonics, GRIN optics and the hybrid technology combining these two emerging fields, named GRIN-Plasmonics.

Biography:
Myungkoo Kang earned his Ph.D. degree under the supervision of Professor Rachel S. Goldman in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan in 2014. During his Ph.D, he extensively studied the influence of energetic ion beams on a wide range of III-V compound semiconductors at the nanoscale and demonstrated the counterintuitive self-assembly of novel nanostructures arrays with arbitrarily tunable dimensions. He systematically characterized localized surface plasmon resonances of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle arrays with performance comparable to those of Ag and Au nanoparticles, and demonstrated Ga nanoparticle plasmon-induced enhancement of light emission from GaAs up to 3.3X, which is the first ever combination of a new plasmonic material (Ga) and a new fabrication method (ion beam) for plasmonics. Since then, he has been continuing his academic career as a post-doctoral research fellow under the co-supervision of Professor Theresa S. Mayer in the Department of Electrical Engineering (currently vice president for research and innovation at Virginia Tech) and Distinguished Professor Carlo G. Pantano in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. During his tenure as a postdoctoral research fellow, he has developed and demonstrated a new laser exposure-based process for gradient refractive index fabrication using multicomponent Ge-As-Se-Pb thin film and bulk systems with high Pb content that provides an opportunity for next generation mid-wavelength infrared lenses. Using spatially-controlled ion and laser irradiation processes and cutting edge material/optical characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry, he is striving to understand how energetic ion and laser irradiation processes can be optimized on a wide range of semiconductors and glass systems to efficiently create novel nanocomposites with spatially-tunable nanostructure dimensions and desirable properties that are promising for next generation plasmonic and transmissive optical devices, respectively.

For more information:
Dr. Kathleen A. Richardson

Friday, November 18, 2016

SPIE Student Chapter Seminar: "Designing the James Webb Space Telescope" by Dr. Jonathan Arenberg, 11.29.16/12:00PM-1:00PM/ CREOL RM 102/103

SPIE Student Chapter Seminar: "Designing the James Webb Space Telescope" by Dr. Jonathan Arenberg
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 102/103

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Dr. Jonathan Arenberg

Abstract:
The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is being designed and built to see the furthest visible objects in the Universe and is NASA's flagship space astrophysics mission. This lecture will discuss how JWST's mission is being achieved and the current project status. The main science themes for JWST will be introduced and the flow of mission requirements into the hardware design and operations concepts will be explored. Emphasis will be given to how the non-optical aspects, such as thermal, packaging and dynamics of the system contribute to the scientific performance. Examples of solutions to archetypal interdisciplinary JWST design problems will be shown. Finally, the current status of the flight hardware as it proceeds through manufacture, assembly, integration and test.

Biography:Jonathan Arenberg has been with Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems since 1989 having started with Hughes Aircraft Company. His work experience includes optical, space and laser systems. Dr. Arenberg has worked on such astronomical programs as the Chandra X-ray Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope and helped develop the New Worlds Observer concept for the imaging of extra-solar planets. He has also worked on major high-energy and tactical laser systems, laser component engineering and metrology issues. He is a member of the ISO sub-committee charged with writing standards for laser and electro-optic systems and components, SPIE, American Astronomical Society and AIAA. Dr. Arenberg holds a BS in physics and an MS and PhD in engineering, all from the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of over 100 conference presentations and publications, and holds 11 U.S. Patents in a wide variety of areas of technology with US and foreign patents pending.
For more information:
Steffen Wittek

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

LPTH Press Release: LightPath Technologies Reports Fiscal 2017 Q1 Financial Results


For Immediate Release
LightPath Technologies Reports
Fiscal 2017 First Quarter Financial Results

ORLANDO, FL – November 14, 2016 – LightPath Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: LPTH) (“LightPath,” the “Company,” or “we”), a leading vertically integrated global manufacturerdistributorand integrator of proprietary optical and infrared components and high-level assemblies, today announced financial results for the fiscal 2017 first quarter ended September 30, 2016.

Fiscal 2017 First Quarter Highlights and Recent Developments:

  • Revenue for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 increased 19% to $5.0 million, as compared to $4.2 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2016. 
  • Gross margin as a percentage of revenue in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was 57%, as compared to 54% in the first quarter of fiscal 2016.
  • Transaction expenses of $484,000 were incurred in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 in connection with the Company’s acquisition of ISP Optics Corporation, with additional expenses to be incurred in the second quarter of fiscal 2017 as the Company pursues completion of the transaction.
  • Operating income for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was $390,000, as compared to $665,000 for the first quarter of fiscal 2016.
  • Net income for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was $140,000, as compared to $843,000 for the first quarter of fiscal 2016.
  • EBITDA* for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was approximately $662,000, as compared to approximately $1.0 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2016. 
  • Adjusted EBITDA*, which excludes the non-cash income or expense related to the change in fair value of the Company’s warrant liability, was $618,000, as compared with $671,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2016.
  • 12-month backlog was approximately $5.8 million at September 30, 2016, as compared to approximately $6.6 million at June 30, 2016.
  • Cash balance at September 30, 2016 was $3.6 million, an increase of 23% compared to June 30, 2016.
*This press release includes references to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (“EBITDA”), adjusted EBITDA, adjusted net income (loss), and gross margin, all of which are non-GAAP financial measures. A “non-GAAP financial measure” is generally defined as a numerical measure of a company’s historical or future performance that excludes or includes amounts, or is subject to adjustments, so as to be different from the most directly comparable measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP.  Our management believes that certain non-GAAP financial measures, when considered together with the GAAP financial measures, provide information that is useful to investors in understanding period-over-period operating results separate and apart from items that may, or could, have a disproportionately positive or negative impact on results in any particular period.  A reconciliation of GAAP to non-GAAP results is provided in this press release in the accompanying tables. A more complete explanation of these measures is also included below under the heading “Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures.

Management Comments

Jim Gaynor, President and Chief Executive Officer of LightPath, commented, “Our strategy to organically grow certain of our product groups and our profitability enhancing initiatives announced in February 2015 have resulted in a strong financial performance and good cash flow generation in the first quarter of fiscal 2017.  In addition, during the quarter we continued working towards completing the proposed acquisition of ISP Optics Corporation, which we believe will be transformative for LightPath.  We believe this acquisition will significantly add to our global scale and scope and have financial benefits both in the long and short term.”

“We expect ISP to materially strengthen our global presence with leading diamond turning and polishing capabilities for custom optics which we do not presently possess and accelerate growth of our infrared product group through its more comprehensive infrared technologies. The acquisition will have the effect of  combining two leading companies with complementary businesses that have the potential for meaningful sales, marketing and product development synergies.”

“Our employees have diligently focused on completing the ISP acquisition while not losing sight of the Company’s fundamental objectives.  Our revenue continues to increase above our ten-year historical range, which we believe is a testament to our demand creation model and the strengthening of our global brand for high value molded optics.  Our revenue growth was very encouraging in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 since we did not have meaningful contributions from our specialty products group and non-recurring engineering projects.  These product groups are substantial components of our consolidated annual revenues but are less recurring in nature, with respect to non-recurring engineering projects, or represent newer product platforms, in the case of our specialty products group, so their quarterly contributions to revenue may vary.”

Mr. Gaynor continued, “From a broader perspective, we believe we have benefited from long-term growth drivers including increased demand in telecommunications, growth in industrial tools due to the Chinese stimulus in construction and the commercialization of infrared products and the successful execution of our strategy to diversify our product lines and end markets.  In turn, we believe we have increased our market share taking market share from other manufacturers. We remain committed to investing in our products and processes which enable us to deliver high volumes of industry-leading quality lenses at comparatively low cost.” 

“Beyond our revenue growth and marketing progress, we continue to deliver improvements in profitability.  Our gross margins have been trending higher and improved to 57% in the first quarter of fiscal 2017.  Our improved gross margin allows us to manage our costs against a decline in the average selling prices of our products due to market pressures.  We believe we are positioned well for continued growth both organically and through acquisitions.”

Financial Results for Three Months Ended September 30, 2016 Compared to the Three Months Ended September 30, 2015

Revenue for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was approximately $5.0 million, an increase of approximately $810,000, or 19%, as compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year.  The increase from the first quarter of the prior fiscal year is attributable to an 80% increase in revenues generated by sales of our high volume precision molded optics (“HVPMO”) lenses, a 41% increase in revenues generated by our infrared lenses, and a 16% increase in revenues generated by sales of our low volume precision molded optics (“LVPMO”) lenses and, partially offset by a 32% decrease in revenues from specialty products and a 5% decrease in revenues from non-recurring engineering  (“NRE”) projects.  The decrease in revenues generated by our specialty product group was due to the absence of approximately $335,000 of revenues generated in the first quarter of the prior year due to fiber collimator assemblies sold to a customer pursuant to a license agreement, which we did not generate this year.

Gross margin as a percentage of revenue in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was 57%, compared to 54% in the first quarter of fiscal 2016.  The improvement in gross margin is attributed to increased revenues from our  HVPMO products with a higher average selling price, leverage borne out of higher sales volume against fixed manufacturing overhead expenses and better yields for infrared products.  Gross profit in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was $2.8 million, compared to $2.3 million in the prior year period, an increase of 22%.  Total cost of sales was approximately $2.2 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2017, an increase of approximately $228,000, compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year.  The 12% increase in cost of sales favorably compares to the 19% increase in revenue to deliver the improved gross margin.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2017, total costs and expenses were approximately $2.4 million, an increase of approximately $856,000 compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year.  The increase was primarily due to: (i) a $484,000 increase in expenses related to the acquisition of ISP, (ii) a $55,000 increase in travel expenses, (iii) a $49,000 increase in stock compensation expense related to the immediate vesting of restricted stock units upon a former director’s resignation from the board, (iv) a $49,000 increase in legal and auditing fee expenses, (v) a $64,000 increase in R&D wages, (vi) a $65,000 increase in materials used for engineering projects to expand and enhance our existing products and (vii) an $89,000 increase in other expenses.  Excluding the costs we expect to incur in the future related to the acquisition of ISP, we expect SG&A costs to decrease slightly during the remainder of fiscal 2017, and return to more normal levels.

In the first quarter of fiscal 2017, we recognized non-cash income of approximately $44,000 related to the change in the fair value of warrants issued in connection with the June 2012 private placement.  In the first quarter of fiscal 2016, we recognized non-cash income of approximately $368,000 related to the change in the fair value of these warrants.  The applicable accounting rules for the warrant liability requires the recognition of either non-cash expense or non-cash income, which has a significant correlation to the change in the market value of our common stock for the period being reported and the assumptions on when the warrants will be exercised.  The likelihood of exercise increases as the expiration date of the warrant approaches.  The warrants have a five-year life and will expire in December 2017.  The fair value will be re-measured each reporting period until the warrants are exercised or expire.

Income tax expense was approximately $265,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2017, an increase of $263,000 from the first quarter of fiscal 2016.  Although we have net operating loss (“NOL”) carry forward benefits of $86 million against net income as reported on a consolidated basis in the United States, the NOL does not apply to taxable income from foreign subsidiaries.  The increase in income tax expense in fiscal 2017 was primarily attributable to income taxes associated with our Chinese operations. We utilized all NOL carryforwards in China during fiscal 2016.  Accordingly, we are now accruing income taxes in China related to such operations.  Our Chinese subsidiaries are governed by the Income Tax Law of the People’s Republic of China, which is applicable to privately run and foreign invested enterprises, and which generally subjects such enterprises to a statutory rate of 25% on income reported in the statutory financial statements after appropriate tax adjustments.

Net income for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was $140,000, or $0.01 per basic and diluted common share, which includes non-cash income of approximately $44,000, or $0.01 per basic and diluted common share, for the change in the fair value of the warrant liability, compared with net income of approximately $843,000, or $0.06 per basic and $0.05 per diluted common share, which includes non-cash income of approximately $368,000, or $0.03 per basic and diluted common share, for the change in the fair value of the warrant liability for the same period in fiscal 2016.  Our net income was negatively affected by the increase in our selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) costs in the first quarter of fiscal 2017, as compared to the prior year period,  which increase included approximately $484,000 as a result of expenses incurred related to the proposed acquisition of ISP.  Adjusted net income, which is adjusted for the effect of the non-cash change in the fair value of the warrant liability, decreased to approximately $97,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2017, as compared to $475,000 in the same period of fiscal 2016. 

The Company had foreign currency exchange expense in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 due to changes in the value of the Chinese yuanin the amount of approximately $36,000, which had no impact on basic and diluted earnings per share.  This compares to foreign currency exchange expense of $176,000, with a $0.01 impact on income per share in the same period of the prior fiscal year. 
Weighted-average basic and diluted common shares outstanding increased to 15,616,855 and 17,152,771, respectively, in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 from 15,239,366 and 16,542,934, respectively, in the first quarter of fiscal 2016.  The increase was primarily due to shares of common stock issued under the 2014 Employee Stock Purchase Plan and exercises of stock options and warrants.
EBITDA for the first quarter of fiscal 2017 was approximately $662,000 compared to approximately $1.0 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2016.  The difference in EBITDA between periods was principally caused by higher non-cash income in the fair value of the June 2012 warrant liability.  Adjusted EBITDA, which eliminates the non-cash income or expense related to the change in fair value of the June 2012 warrant liability, was approximately $618,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 as compared with approximately $671,000 for the same period of the prior fiscal year  EBITDA was negatively affected in fiscal 2017 due primarily to the recognition of higher non-cash income as a result of the fair value of the June 2012 warrant liability, and the increase in our SG&A costs, which included approximately $484,000 as a result of expenses incurred related to the proposed acquisition of ISP. 
Cash and cash equivalents totaled approximately $3.6 million as of September 30, 2016, a 23% increase from June 30, 2016.  Cash flow provided by operations was approximately $922,000 for the first quarter of fiscal 2017, compared with $897,000 in the prior year.  During the first quarter of fiscal 2017, we expended approximately $387,000 for capital equipment while growing our cash balance, as compared to $285,000 in the same period last year.  The current ratio as of September 30, 2016 was 3.3 to 1, compared to 3.5 to 1 as of June 30, 2016.  Total stockholders’ equity as of September 30, 2016 was approximately $11.4 million, a 4% increase compared to approximately $10.9 million as of June 30, 2016.

As of September 30, 2016, the Company’s 12-month backlog was $5.8 million, compared to $6.6 million as of June 30, 2016, a decrease of approximately 12%.  This lower backlog resulted from a delay in anticipated orders for some bookings forecasted in the first quarter of fiscal 2017 and an increase in shipments of orders received and shipped within the first quarter of fiscal 2017.
   
*Use of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

To provide investors with additional information regarding our financial results, this press release includes references to EBITDA, adjusted EBITDA, adjusted net income (loss), and gross margin, all of which are non-GAAP financial measures.  For a reconciliation of these non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP, see the tables provided in this press release. 

A “non-GAAP financial measure” is generally defined as a numerical measure of a company’s historical or future performance that excludes or includes amounts, or is subject to adjustments, so as to be different from the most directly comparable measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP.  Our management believes that these non-GAAP financial measures, when considered together with the GAAP financial measures, provide information that is useful to investors in understanding period-over-period operating results separate and apart from items that may, or could, have a disproportionately positive or negative impact on results in any particular period.  Management also believes that these non-GAAP financial measures enhance the ability of investors to analyze our underlying business operations and understand our performance.  In addition, management may utilize these non-GAAP financial measures as guides in forecasting, budgeting, and planning.  Non-GAAP financial measures should be considered in addition to, and not as a substitute for, or superior to, financial measures presented in accordance with GAAP.

We calculate EBITDA by adjusting net income (loss) to exclude net interest expense, income tax expense or benefit, depreciation, and amortization.  Similarly, we calculate adjusted EBITDA by adjusting net income (loss) to exclude net interest expense, income tax expense or benefit depreciation, amortization, the change in the fair value of the warrants issued in connection with the private placement in June 2012.

The fair value of the warrants issued in connection with the private placement in 2012 is re-measured each reporting period until the warrants are exercised or expire.  Each reporting period, the change in the fair value of these warrants is either recognized as non-cash expense or non-cash income.  The change in the fair value of the warrants has a significant correlation to the change in the market value of our common stock for the period being reported and is not impacted by actual operations during such period.  We believe that by excluding the change in the fair value of these warrants enhances the ability of investors to analyze and better understand the underlying business operations and performance.

We calculate adjusted net income by adjusting net income (loss) to exclude the change in the fair value of the warrants issued in connection with the private placement in June 2012. 

We calculate gross margin by deducting the cost of sales from operating revenue.  Cost of sales includes manufacturing direct and indirect labor, materials, services, fixed costs for rent, utilities and depreciation, and variable overhead.  Gross margin should not be considered an alternative to operating income or net income, which is determined in accordance with GAAP.  We believe that gross margin, although a non-GAAP financial measure, is useful and meaningful to investors as a basis for making investment decisions.  It provides investors with information that demonstrates cost structure and provides funds for our total costs and expenses.  We use gross margin in measuring the performance of its business and has historically analyzed and reported gross margin information publicly.  Other companies may calculate gross margin in a different manner.

Investor Conference Call and Webcast Details:

LightPath will host an audio conference call and webcast on Monday, November 14 at 4:30 p.m. ET to discuss its financial and operational performance for the fiscal 2017 first quarter ended September 30, 2016.

Date: Monday, November 14, 2016
Time: 4:30 PM (ET)
Dial-in Number: 1-877-317-2514
International Dial-in Number: 1-412-317-2514


Participants should dial-in or log-on approximately 10 minutes prior to the start of the event.  A replay of the call will be available approximately one hour after completion through November 28, 2016. To listen to the replay, dial 1-877-344-7529 (domestic) or 1-412-317-0088 (international), and enter conference ID # 10096549.

About LightPath Technologies

LightPath Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: LPTH) provides optics and photonics solutions for the industrial, defense, telecommunications, testing and measurement, and medical industries.  LightPath designs, manufactures, and distributes optical and infrared components including molded glass aspheric lenses and assemblies, infrared lenses and thermal imaging assemblies, fused fiber collimators, and gradient index GRADIUM® lenses.  LightPath also offers custom optical assemblies, including full engineering design support.  For more information, visit www.lightpath.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This release includes statements that constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of federal securities laws, which are statements other than historical facts and that frequently use words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “position,” “should,” “strategy,” “target,” “will” and similar words.  All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this release.  Although we believe that the plans, intentions, and expectations reflected in or suggested by the forward-looking statements are reasonable, there is no assurance that these plans, intentions, or expectations will be achieved.  Therefore, actual outcomes and results could materially differ from what is expressed, implied, or forecasted in such statements.  This release contains certain forward-looking statements that are based on current plans and expectations and are subject to various risks and uncertainties.  Our business may be influenced by many factors that are difficult to predict, involve uncertainties that may materially affect results, and are often beyond our control.  Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, factors detailed by us in our public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  All forward-looking statements included in this press release are expressly qualified in their entirety by such cautionary statements.  Except as required under the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, we do not have any intention or obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. 
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Friday, November 11, 2016

SPIE Student Chapter Faculty Talk Series: "Long and Sinuous Way in Optics Research - Part II" by Dr. Leonid Glebov 11.16.16/12:00PM-1:00PM/CREOL RM 103

SPIE Student Chapter Faculty Talk Series: "Long and Sinuous Way in Optics Research - Part II" by Dr. Leonid Glebov
Wednesday, November 16th, 2016 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

http://www.creol.ucf.edu/People/images/200x300Portrait/326.jpg

Abstract:
 I will continue to talk about a long (almost half century) path in optics that went through basic and applied research, administrative and business involvement, different countries and economic systems. I will try to show the importance of understanding not only your scientific field but principles of interaction with people and communities of different scale from laboratory to country.

Biography:
Leonid B. Glebov earned his Ph.D. in Physics (major in Optics) from State Optical Institute (SOI), Leningrad, Russia in 1976. He was affiliated with this institute until 1995. During which time he held various positions in research and scientific management. After his tenure at SOI, Glebov joined the University of Central Florida School of Optics/CREOL. He has published one book, 190+ papers in scientific journals and holds more than 16 patents (15+ Russian and 1 US). He is a member of Organizing and Program Committees for a number of International Conferences. The main directions of his research are optical properties of glasses, photosensitive glasses for hologram recording, nonlinear phenomena including laser-induced damage, holographic optical elements.

For additional information:
Steffen Wittek

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

TOMORROW! IEEE Distinguished Seminar: "Space-Time Dualities and Temporal Imaging of Optical Waveforms" by Dr. Brian H. Kolner, 11.10.16/11:30AM-12:30PM/CREOL RM 103

IEEE Distinguished Seminar: "Space-Time Dualities and Temporal Imaging of Optical Waveforms" by Dr. Brian H. Kolner
Thursday, November 10, 2016 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
CREOL Room 103

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Prof. Brian H. Kolner

Abstract:There is an intriguing duality between the equations of Fresnel diffraction and narrowband dispersion. In addition, a quadratic time phase modulation applied to an optical waveform produces the dual of a lens; therefore, it can be thought of as a “time lens”. By combining appropriate dispersion before and after the time lens we can create the temporal analog of an imaging system which allows for magnification, demagnification and local time reversal of optical waveforms while preserving their envelope profiles. Time lenses can be realized by electro-optic modulation as well as optical parametric processes of both second and higher order. The requisite dispersion is realized by the natural dispersion available in optical fibers or with delay lines based on prisms or gratings. In this lecture I will develop the dualities between the diffraction and dispersion problems, present the defining characteristics of time lenses and develop the equations of temporal imaging, magnification, resolution, etc. Interesting applications include stretching time waveforms from the femtosecond to picosecond scale, pulse compression, signal processing and even temporal cloaking. The historical timeline for temporal imaging appears to have its roots in chirp radar, although all of the mathematics were available long before the advent of radar.

Biography:Brian Kolner received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1979 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1981 and 1985, respectively. He was a Member of the Technical Staff at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA, from 1985 to 1991, and in 1991, he joined the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and became Vice Chairman for Undergraduate Affairs in 1993. At UCLA, he taught courses in microwave theory and measurements, Fourier optics, and quantum mechanics and conducted research on space-time duality and temporal imaging. In 1996, he moved to the University of California, Davis, where he held joint appointments in the Departments of Applied Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His current research interests are in optical clocks, laser phase and amplitude noise, space-time analogies and terahertz spectroscopy. In 2015 he became a Visiting Scholar at the W. W. Hansen Laboratory of Experimental Physics at Stanford University where he collaborates on high-stability optical clocks. Dr. Kolner was awarded a David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship in 1991. In 1996 and 2003 he served as Guest Editor for the IEEE Journal of Special Topics in Quantum Electronics. In 2009 Dr. Kolner shared an R&D 100 Award for developing the time-microscope, in 2010 he became a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and in 2012 he was elected a Fellow of the IEEE. He has been an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer for the Photonics Society for the 2015-2016 year and was recently named one of 125 People of Impact from the University of Wisconsin Electrical and Computer Engineering Department on occasion of their 125th anniversary.

For more information:
Juan He

Thursday, November 3, 2016

TOMORROW! Seminar: "Van der Waals Heterojunctions for Nanophotonics and Energy-efficient Electronics " by Dr. Tania Roy, 11.04.16/12:00PM-1:00PM/CREOL RM 103

Seminar: "Van der Waals Heterojunctions for Nanophotonics and Energy-efficient Electronics " by Dr. Tania Roy
Friday, November 4, 2016 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Tania Roy, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Joint Appointment with NanoScience Technology Center, Materials Science & Engineering, and ICAMR

Abstract:
Two-dimensional materials show immense potential as successor to silicon for next generation electronics. The family of 2D materials allows a wide range of bandgaps to select from. The ability to stack these 2D materials without any lattice mismatch allows easy construction of vertical van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures. A naturally passivated surface without dangling bonds helps in integration with photonic structures such as waveguides and cavities. Despite being atomically thin, many 2D materials interact strongly with light. Amazingly enough, defects in these monolayers can be chemically passivated to enhance luminescence efficiency close to 100%. From gapless graphene to direct band-gap monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), these 2D materials allow for the realization of various nanophotonic devices and the exploration of fundamental optical sciences, covering a wide spectral range from the microwave to the ultraviolet.
In this talk, a vdW heterojunction-based all-two-dimensional transistor will be discussed. The all-2D transistor shows no surface roughness scattering, a property hitherto unforeseen in its three dimensional counterparts. A dual-gated MoS2/WSe2 vdW heterojunction diode can be tuned to operate in various diode operation regimes. The same device operates as a forward rectifying diode as well as a tunnel diode, merely by application of gate voltage. The first observation of gate controlled band to band tunneling in semiconducting 2D heterostructures was made here, enhancing the prospects of using vdW heterojunctions for low power electronic applications. The tunability of band alignment opens up prospects of using this system for a gate-tunable light emitting diode. A 2D/2D tunnel field effect transistor with WSe2 and SnSe2 will be discussed. VdW heterojunctions with graphene/h-BN/graphene show negative differential resistance, which can be used in analog applications, such as in oscillators and amplifiers. Also, a graphene/insulator/graphene heterostructure demonstrates resistive switching and can be used to make ultra-low power resistive memories. Thus, vdW heterojunctions display a new paradigm of materials innovation to sustain the aggressive improvement of electronics and optoelectronics for the continued betterment of human lives.

Biography:
Tania Roy is an Assistant Professor at the NanoScience Technology Center at UCF since July 2016. She received B.E. (Hons.) in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from B.I.T.S. Pilani, India in 2006. She obtained her Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Vanderbilt University, TN in December 2011, where she worked on the reliability of GaN/AlGaN high electron mobility transistors for high power and high frequency electronics. Following that, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at Georgia Institute of Technology on graphene-based devices for low power applications till 2013. She joined University of California, Berkeley as a postdoc in 2014 where she worked on two-dimensional materials for future generation electronics. She made the world’s first all-two-dimensional transistor, and reported the first gate controlled Esaki diode with van der Waals heterojunctions. Her research interests include using novel functional materials for energy-efficient electronics and optoelectronics.

For more information: 
Mercedeh Khajavikhan