Monday, June 29, 2015

TOMORROW!! Seminar: "The Photonic Lantern" by Dr. Sergio G. Leon-Saval 6.30.15/ 1:00-2:00pm/ CREOL RM 103

Seminar: "The Photonic Lantern" by Dr. Sergio G. Leon-Saval
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Sergio G. Leon-Saval

Abstract:
The photonic lantern is a low-loss optical waveguide device that connects one multimode waveguide to several waveguides that each support fewer modes. Further, photonic lanterns are mode convertors/transformers with low loss, that can also introduce mode selectivity, scale to many modes, and can be easily integrated with current technologies. In this talk we will review how photonic lanterns are made, how they work and some of the design principles to be understood in these type of devices.

Biography:
Sergio G. Leon-Saval was awarded his PhD by the University of Bath, UK, in 2006. In October 2007 he joined the Optical Fibre Technology Centre (OFTC) in Sydney, Australia. In 2009, he moved to the Institute of Photonics and Optical Science (IPOS), University of Sydney, Australia where he is currently part of the IPOS Executive Committee; a faculty member of the School of Physics; and Director of the Sydney Astrophotonics Instrumentation Laboratory (SAIL). He has more than 12 years of experience in the area of photonic devices and astrophotonics; during that time he has been involved in several breakthroughs related to multimode photonics, optical fibre technology and astronomical instrumentation. He has direct experience on the fabrication, modelling, and development of optical devices and instrumentation, understanding both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Dr Leon-Saval has co-authored over 55 international refereed journals and more than 100 conference papers and two books chapters since 2004 with over 2661 citations, and a h-index of 25.

For additional information:
Dr. Rodrigo Amezcua Correa

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Seminar: "Pushing the limits in glass properties and structures for laser, sensing and nonlinearity applications by Dr. Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem 7.10.15/12:00-1:00pm/ CREOL RM 103

Seminar: "Pushing the limits in glass properties and structures for laser, sensing and nonlinearity applications by Dr. Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem
Friday, July 10, 2015 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

 http://www.creol.ucf.edu/NewsEvents/Attachments/Events/1062/Professor%20Heike%20Ebendorff-Heidepriem.jpg
Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem
Associate Professor 
Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing,
The University of Adelaide, Australia 

Abstract
Speciality optical fibres are of growing interest for a diverse applications including lasing, sensing and nonlinear processing. Both glass properties and fibre structures are used to tailor the fibre properties. Hence, there is increasing demand for creating novel glass properties and new structures to improve and extend fibre performance. In addition to optical properties, thermomechanical properties play a key role in the suitability of glasses for practical applications. This talk reviews the progress in pushing the limits in glass properties and fabrication of fibre structures.
Depending on their glass composition, glasses exhibit a wide range of optical properties such as linear refractive indices of 1.4-2.8, nonlinear refractive indices spanning three order of magnitude over of 1017-1020 m2/W and transmission windows that are situated within 200nm – 20µm. Recently, incorporation of nanocrystals such as nanodiamond has gained significant attention as a pathway to add functionality to glass.
The glass fabrication conditions have a significant impact on the material loss of glass. For example, large amount of research has been dedicated to reduce water content in heavy metal oxide glasses to access the intrinsic infrared transmission of these glasses.
A range of techniques has been used to fabricate nano/microstructured fibres. Recent progress in extrusion has extended significantly the range of fibre structures that have been made as well as the range of materials that have been exploited for fibre fabrication. In addition, ultrasonic drilling and milling of preforms opened up new structures. Another technique to create microstructure into glass is direct laser writing of regions with modified refractive index. This technique enabled creation of low-loss waveguide into ZBLAN fluoride glass.
The talk will also present opportunities of different glasses and structures for diverse range of applications spanning fluoroindate fibres for mid-infrared transmission, fluorozirconate waveguides as chip lasers, tellurite microspheres for nanoparticle sensing, heavy metal oxide glass fibres for nonlinear optical processing, suspended and exposed core fibres for different sensing platforms.

Biography
Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem received the Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of Jena, Germany, in 1994. She subsequently held two prestigious fellowships and was received the Weyl International Glass Science Award. During 2001-2004 she was with the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton, UK. Since 2005, she has been with the University of Adelaide, Australia. Currently, she is one of the leaders of the Optical Materials & Structures Theme and the Deputy Director of the Institute for Photonics & Advanced Sensing. Her research focuses on the development of novel optical glasses, fibres, surface functionalization and sensing approaches.

For additional information:
Guang-Ming "Derek" Tao

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Seminar: "The Photonic Lantern" by Dr. Sergio G. Leon-Saval 6.30.15/1:00-2:00pm/ CREOL RM 103

Seminar: "The Photonic Lantern" by Dr. Sergio G. Leon-Saval
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
CREOL Room 103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015

Sergio G. Leon-Saval

Abstract:
The photonic lantern is a low-loss optical waveguide device that connects one multimode waveguide to several waveguides that each support fewer modes. Further, photonic lanterns are mode convertors/transformers with low loss, that can also introduce mode selectivity, scale to many modes, and can be easily integrated with current technologies. In this talk we will review how photonic lanterns are made, how they work and some of the design principles to be understood in these type of devices.

Biography:
Sergio G. Leon-Saval was awarded his PhD by the University of Bath, UK, in 2006. In October 2007 he joined the Optical Fibre Technology Centre (OFTC) in Sydney, Australia. In 2009, he moved to the Institute of Photonics and Optical Science (IPOS), University of Sydney, Australia where he is currently part of the IPOS Executive Committee; a faculty member of the School of Physics; and Director of the Sydney Astrophotonics Instrumentation Laboratory (SAIL). He has more than 12 years of experience in the area of photonic devices and astrophotonics; during that time he has been involved in several breakthroughs related to multimode photonics, optical fibre technology and astronomical instrumentation. He has direct experience on the fabrication, modelling, and development of optical devices and instrumentation, understanding both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Dr Leon-Saval has co-authored over 55 international refereed journals and more than 100 conference papers and two books chapters since 2004 with over 2661 citations, and a h-index of 25.

For additional information:
Dr. Rodrigo Amezcua Correa

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

National Photonics Initiative

In this Issue

IP-IMI Progress

Advocacy on Capitol Hill


White House BRAIN Initiative

Leadership Changes
During the first half of 2015, the National Photonics Initiative (NPI) has had remarkable success in advancing the photonics agenda in Washington. The NPI walked the halls of Congress educating lawmakers about photonics and advocating for critical funding; members of the NPI Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group were invited by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to present the group’s technology road map during a BRAIN Initiative meeting; and the Integrated Photonics Institute for Manufacturing Innovation (IP-IMI), the culmination of over a year of work from the NPI, is expected to be announced this month.
Within the NPI, we welcome new leadership in Alan Willner following the conclusion of Tom Baer’s fantastic chairmanship in March. Alan has long served as a member of the NPI Steering Committee and brings to the NPI a wealth of photonics knowledge and passion. Tom will continue to serve the NPI as a member of the Steering Committee and chair of the Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group.
Progress on the Integrated Photonics Institute for Manufacturing Innovation (IP-IMI)
The NPI eagerly awaits the final selection from the Department of Defense (DOD) for the consortium awarded the IP-IMI; the decision is expected to be announced in June. While the NPI did not endorse any specific IP-IMI proposal, we find all three finalists – led by University of Central Florida, University of Southern California and the Research Foundation for the State University of New York – to be excellent candidates and look forward to working with the awardee to help ensure its long-term success.

The IP-IMI is the culmination of over a year of work from the NPI which began with several iterations of a white paper and conversations with OSTP, the result of which was a recommendation made by the NPI to the administration for a photonics prototyping and advanced manufacturing facility. “Strategic Request: A National Photonics Prototyping and Advanced Manufacturing Facility to Ensure Economic Growth and National Security” was submitted by the NPI to OSTP in February 2014, and opened the door to conversations between the NPI and DOD.

In June 2014, DOD announced a Request for Information (RFI), the first step in the process of creating a new public-private innovative manufacturing institute (IMI) as part of the President’s National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI). In the RFI, DOD listed technological areas under consideration, which included photonics for the first time. The NPI hosted a webinar that included a DOD official and spurred the optics and photonics community to respond. The RFI led to a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to support the establishment of an IP-IMI to advance the design, manufacture, testing, assembly, and packaging of complex photonic integrated circuits that combine a variety of photonic and electronic components to achieve functionality.

The NPI and its supporting societies, the American Physical Society (APS), the IEEE Photonics Society, the Laser Institute of America (LIA), the Optical Society (OSA) and the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), are prepared to support the IP-IMI, and by association work with the DOD, by leveraging the platforms, programs and resources of these societies. The NPI looks forward to continuing its role as an advocate for the photonics community and continuing to serve as a private sector resource for the DOD as it moves forward with its IP-IMI selection process.

Advocating for Photonics on Capitol Hill
National Photonics Initiative, the Hill fly-in
From right to left: Tom Battley, Pedro Vallejo-Ramirez, Filipp Ignatovich and Alexander Mitropoulos with Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).
For the second year in a row, the NPI participated in Congressional Visits Day (CVD) – a two-day event in March that brings scientists, engineers, researchers, educators, and technology executives to Washington to raise visibility and support for science, engineering, and technology. CVD is coordinated by coalitions of companies, professional societies and educational institutions and it is open to all who believe that science and technology comprise the cornerstone of our nation's future.

On behalf of the NPI, society members and volunteers fanned out across Capitol Hill to meet with and lobby lawmakers on the importance of photonics. Turnout this year was great with 30 individuals visiting over 50 congressional offices. Key messages discussed in congressional meetings included:
  • Reauthorize the America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) Act, which invests in innovation through research and development and improves US competitiveness.
  • Support funding for the Revitalize American Manufacturing and Innovation (RAMI) Act, which passed in 2014 and authorizes the establishment of several Centers for Manufacturing Innovation. The NPI asked Congress to support America’s advanced manufacturing ecosystem by providing $150 million in funding to NIST for the NNMI program for FY 2016.
  • Support the President’s budget request for science R&D funding within the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science, as well as an overall funding increase for science and technology programs within the Department of Defense (DOD).
National Photonics Initiative, the Hill fly-in
From right to left: Krisinda Plenkovich, SPIE; Rich Vohanel, Corning; Farzan Ghaur, Vardex Laser Solutions; Rep. Leonard Lance (R-NJ); Naresh Chand, Huawei; and Tyler Morgus, Thorlabs.
We have already seen some quick results from discussions with lawmakers: in the House Energy Appropriations bill, it was included that DOE support, “Highly Integrated Photonics to accelerate computing research leading to exascale computing while reducing computing energy consumption by a factor of 100 or more;” in late May, the House Appropriations Committee approved the Fiscal Year 2016 Commerce, Justice, Science Bill which directs $675 million to NIST and $5.98 billion to the National Science Foundation (NSF); and, in the House COMPETES bill, it was included that “Longstanding United States leadership in supercomputing, genomics, nanoscience, photonics, quantum physics, and other key technological areas is jeopardized if United States investments in basic research in the natural sciences do not keep pace.” The NPI will continue to work with our elected officials in Washington to push for the inclusion of photonics and photonics-related funding in current and upcoming legislation.
NPI Participates in White House BRAIN Initiative Meeting
National
Photonics Initiative, the Hill fly-in
Eugene Arthurs, SPIE CEO, Tom Baer, NPI past-president, and Elizabeth Rogan, OSA CEO, attended the White House BRAIN Initiative meeting on September 30, 2014.
On March 27, 2015, the NPI was invited to participate in another meeting of the White House Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. NPI Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group Chair Tom Baer was joined by other members of the NPI group including Steve Laderman of Agilent and Mark Schnitzer of Stanford University. The NPI was one of only a handful of non-funding agencies represented at the meeting. Funding agency participation included officials from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
During the meeting, the NPI provided industry and academia perspectives on the important role that optics and photonics will play in helping achieve the administration’s BRAIN Initiative goals. Tom Baer also presented a draft technology road map produced by the NPI Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group. The final road map, presented to OSTP on May 1, 2015, detailed recommendations derived from in-depth discussions and information gathered from optics and photonics industry leaders, prominent researchers, and agency program managers who attended several NPI Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group meetings over the course of the past six months. The NPI hopes the road map will launch public/private collaborations, provide insight from Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group industry partners on areas of technology development they are actively pursuing, and illuminate potential areas for economic growth within the US. To read NPI’s “A Technology Road Map for the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative,” click here.
The NPI previously launched the Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group in 2014 alongside officials from the White House and OSTP in support of President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative. The NPI Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group – consisting of top US industry leaders in optics and photonics including Accumetra, LLC, Agilent, Applied Scientific Instrumentation, Coherent, Hamamatsu, Inscopix, Inc., Spectra-Physics and THORLABS – announced that it is committing upwards of $30 million in existing and future research and development (R&D) spending over the next three years to advance optics and photonics technology in support of the BRAIN Initiative.
Under the leadership of the NPI, the industry consortium is working closely with national BRAIN Initiative leadership and neuroscience research communities to help achieve the administration’s objective of revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain.
Leadership Changes at NPI
In March, Tom Baer stepped down from his role as the first chairman of the NPI Steering Committee. During his tenure, Tom built a stronger, more united optics and photonics community. His commitment launched the NPI, helped to shape the future IP-IMI and created a unique role for the optics and photonics industry in the White House BRAIN Initiative. Our community is deeply grateful for Tom's dedication, hard work, guidance and commitment to photonics. Tom will continue to serve the NPI as a member of the Steering Committee and chair of the Photonics Industry Neuroscience Group.

The NPI welcomes its new Steering Committee Chair Alan Willner, who has served on the committee since its inception. Alan currently serves as the Steven and Kathryn Sample Chaired Professor of Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC). Alan also serves as the Associated Director for the Center for Photonics Technology at USC, is a member of the Defense Sciences Research Council, a 16-member body that provides reports to the DARPA Director and Office Directors, and was co-chair of the US National Academies Committee on the Optics and Photonics Study (also called Harnessing Light II). In addition to experience serving on several scientific advisory boards for small companies and advising venture capital firms, Alan founded Phaethon Communications where he worked as CTO. Alan is currently serving as the President-elect of the Optical Society.

Along with Alan, the NPI Steering Committee is comprised of:

Eugene Arthurs – SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE)
Phil Bucksbaum – Stanford University
Tom Baer - Stanford University
Meredith Lee – Stanford University
Bob Lieberman - Lumoptix LLC
Jason Mulliner – Edmund Optics
Liz Rogan – The Optical Society (OSA)
Matt Weed – Open Photoincs, Inc.


Laura Kolton of OSA and Krisinda Plenkovich of SPIE are the committee staff liaisons.

Contact Us

The NPI is interested in hearing from you. Are you interested in joining our efforts? Do you have questions? Need additional information? Please contact Laura Kolton at (202) 416 1499 or lkolto@osa.org, or Krisinda Plenkovich at (360) 685 5518 or krisindap@spie.org.







TOMORROW!! SPIE Faculty Talk Series Seminar: “A Creole boy goes to CREOL: Many hands make light work” by Dr. M.J. Soileau 6.11.15/11:00am-12:00pm/ CREOL RM 102/103

SPIE Faculty Talk Series Seminar: “A Creole boy goes to CREOL: Many hands make light work” by Dr. M.J. Soileau
Thursday, June 11, 2015 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 102/103

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015


Dr. M.J. Soileau
V.P. for Research and Professor of Optics, ECE & Physics

Abstract: 
In this talk I will share my life’s journey in optics.   I will speak about what led me to a career in optics, a very improbable journey indeed!   The first part of the title is a bit of word play relating to my ancestry (9th generation in this country, but first in my family to speak English as my primary language) and the myth about how the name CREOL came about.   The sub title is meant to emphasize that the story I have to tell is about collaboration, mentorship, and friendship.   Anything that I have been able to accomplish in optics is due to the helping hands of many people.   The other meaning intended by the subtitle is that the many hands of the people at CREOL are putting light to work to develop Florida’s innovation economy.

Biography: 
Position: University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL         
Vice President for Research & Commercialization and Distinguished Prof. of Optics, ECE, and Physics, June 1999-Present
Interim Vice President for Research & Graduate Studies, July 1998-June 1999
Director, School of Optics/CREOL, University of Central Florida, January 1987 to June 1999

Education:
Ph.D.  Electrical Engineering/Quantum Electronics-University of Southern California 1979
M.S.    Physics/Optics-University of Utah 1968
B.S.    Astronomy and Physics-Louisiana State University 1967
                                                                                                                  
Present Duties:  Heads the UCF Office of Research & Commercialization which includes:
  1.  Office of Sponsored Programs, which, in turn, is responsible for providing contract and grant services for the university faculty and staff. 
  2. Oversight and management of interdisciplinary centers, including, the Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers (CREOL), the Institute of Simulation and Training (IST), the Nano Science and Technology Center (NSTC), the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), the Advanced Materials Processing and Application Center (AMPAC), Center for Research in Computer Vision (CRCV) and the Florida Space Institute (FSI.)
  3. The UCF Technology Incubator and the university Technology Transfer Office.
  4. The UCF Research Foundation (the VP Research serves as president of this organization.)
  5. Represents the research agenda of the university in the senior administration and in partnerships with federal, state, and local agencies and the private business sector.
  6. Member of the Florida High Tech Corridor Council Core Team.

Current Board Memberships and Community Service:
bioOrlando Scientific Council
Board of Directors of BEAM, Inc. (UCF Spin-off Company)
Board of Directors of Aquafiber, Corp.
Board of Directors of the Florida Photonics Cluster (501.c.3 Corporation)
President UCF Research Foundation (501.c.3 Corporation)
Board of Trustees (past Chairman) of the Orlando Science (501.c.3 corporation)
President, Laser Induced Damage, Inc. (501.c.3 Corporation)
Vice Chairman of the Board, Florida Research Consortium (FRC)(501.c3 corporation)
Board (and Past Chair) of the Orange County Research and Development Authority
Board and Executive Committee of the Astronaut Memorial Foundation
Space Florida Education and Research Committee
Tech Council of Enterprise Florida

Selected Honors:
Gold Medal of the SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2008
Ester Hoffman Beller Medal of the OSA (Optical Society of America), 2007
President of the SPIE-the International Society for Optical Engineering, 1997
Director’s Award, SPIE-the International Society for Optical Engineering, 1998
Fellow of the SPIE, the OSA, AAAS (American Assoc. for the Advancement of Science), National Academy of Inventors, and the IEEE (Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers)
Elected a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Engineering Sciences, 1995
Charter Member, National Academy of Inventors
Distinguished Service Appreciation Medal by the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain

Publications and Presentations: 
Over 170 technical and scientific papers in the general areas of optics, laser induced damage to optical materials and nonlinear optics.

Past Positions: Founding Director of CREOL and the UCF School of Optics, Officer, USAF (1967-73), VP MITS, Inc. (1971-72), Research Scientist, US Navy (1973-80), Prof. Of Physics, University of North Texas, (1980-86).
 For additional information: 


Md Javed Rouf Talukder
407-800-9881

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

LPTH Press Release: LightPath Technologies Supplies Infrared Molded Optics for Firefighting Thermal Imaging Cameras

LightPath Technologies Supplies Infrared Molded Optics for Firefighting Thermal Imaging Cameras

For Immediate Release:


ORLANDO, FL – June 9, 2015 --LightPath Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: LPTH) (“LightPath,” the “Company” or “we”), a leading vertically integrated global manufacturer, distributor and integrator of proprietary optical and infrared components and high-level optical sub-systems, announced today that its Infrared (“IR”) 40 degree Field of View (“FOV”)  molded optical lens assembly has been selected for use in the manufacture of firefighting thermal imaging cameras by a leading supplier of integrated products and technologies for defense departments and federal, state and municipal government agencies worldwide.

Based on a report published in December 2014 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, a division of the Technology Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce, there is increased attention being given to thermal imaging research needs in an effort to support fire fighters, among other first responders.  LightPath’s thermal imaging IR product line enables the advancement of firefighting technologies and supports a key objective of reducing line-of-service deaths and burn injuries.  The report cites the need for creating an information rich environment for greater situational awareness, which may be attained by incorporating the precision and accuracy available through LightPath’s molded IR optics.

According to Maxtec International, Inc., a market research firm covering the infrared and thermal imaging industries, the Uncooled Thermography market in 2014 was $582 million and the demand for thermal imagers has been growing.  There are over 5 million fire fighters worldwide.  In the U.S., there are 1.1million firefighters and more than 35,000 fire departments that respond to nearly 2,000,000 fires every year, according to the National Fire Data Center.

Jim Gaynor, President and Chief Executive Officer of LightPath, commented, “We believe the availability of cutting edge infrared lenses and optical technologies to original equipment manufacturers, including some of the leading defense suppliers in the world, will drive increased adoption of this type of camera that enables fire departments and other first responders to more safely conduct their duties for mission critical success.  This is a very large and vital market where increased levels of government spending are being allocated to ensure the safety of both the firefighters and the people they protect.” 

A thermographic camera (also called an infrared camera or thermal imaging camera) is a device that forms an image using infrared radiation, similar to a common camera that forms an image using visible light. Instead of the 450–750 nanometer range of the visible light camera, infrared cameras operate in wavelengths as long as 14,000 nm (14 µm).

Fire fighters may rely in part on a thermal imaging camera to navigate their way through a burning structure; therefore most imagers employ a wide FOV in the range of 40º to 60º. There are few cases in which a fire fighter would need to focus on an object less than 1 meter away, which encourages the use of relatively robust and lower cost fixed focal length optics that focus from 1 meter to infinity.*
LightPath’s catalog offers an optic products line that meets these and other specifications.

LightPath continues to develop improved capabilities for its IR product line and now offers two types of chalcogenide IR glass materials and several anti-reflective coating options that will cover most requirements in the commercial and military high-volume and small-size application markets.  LightPath’s new catalog offering of IR lens assemblies is stimulating interest in many areas of the market. LightPath is working closely with customer partners to develop both build-to-print and custom optics for new markets.  Product descriptions and other information on LightPath’s IR line can be found online here.

About LightPath Technologies:
LightPath Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: LPTH) provides optics and photonics solutions for the industrial, defense, telecommunications, testing and measurement, and medical industries. LightPath designs, manufactures, and distributes optical and infrared components including molded glass aspheric lenses and assemblies, infrared lenses and thermal imaging assemblies, fused fiber collimators, and gradient index GRADIUM® lenses. LightPath also offers custom optical sub-systems, including full engineering design support.  For more information, visit www.lightpath.com.

This news release includes statements that constitute forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including statements regarding our ability to expand our presence in certain markets, future sales growth, continuing reductions in cash usage and implementation of new distribution channels. This information may involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, factors detailed by LightPath Technologies, Inc. in its public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as required under the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, we do not have any intention or obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

###

Contact:

Glenn Breeze
Executive Director Sales and Marketing
407-382-4003 Ext 310


Investor Contact:

Jordan Darrow
Darrow Associates, Inc.
631-367-1866










Friday, May 29, 2015

Biophotonics Faculty Candidate Seminar: "Analysis of Protein Fibers Using Nonlinear Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy" by Dr. Patrick Koelsch 6.5.15/11:00am-12:00pm/ CREOL RM 102

Seminar: "Analysis of Protein Fibers Using Nonlinear Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy" by Dr. Patrick Koelsch
Friday, June 5, 2015 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
CREOL Room 102

Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015


Patrick Koelsch
Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle.

Abstract:
Protein fibers are a common motif in nature, often essential for the structural integrity of living entities. From a biomedical standpoint, protein fibers occur in the context of many disease related phenomena such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, diabetes mellitus, cancer, or muscular dystrophy - to name a few. This lecture will describe the application of nonlinear optical microscopy and spectroscopy to study the structure of protein fibers, dynamics at early stages of fibril formation, and interaction of protein fibers with other molecules. Examples will include second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) probing schemes that we designed, developed and applied to analyze bone structure, muscle fibers, amyloid fibers in bacterial biofilms, and amyloid structures that occur in Alzheimer’s disease.

Biography:
Professor Koelsch is a faculty member in the Bioengineering Department at the University of Washington. He received his doctoral degree in 2005 while working with Professor Helmuth Mohwald at the Max-Planck-Institute of Colloid and Interface Science. His doctoral research focused on ion specific effects and static and dynamic properties of soluble surfactants at the air/water interface. After a short postdoctoral phase at the University of Leipzig, Professor Koelsch joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Heidelberg where he became an Associate Professor in 2010 (“Privatdozent”). In 2008, Dr. Koelsch was additionally appointed as a research group leader at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology before moving to Seattle in 2011. His laboratory is broadly interested in the behavior of molecules at interfaces with a focus on developing and applying nonlinear optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques.

For additional information:
Dr. Aristide Dogariu

407-823-6839